"A Sand County Almanac"

"THERE ARE SOME WHO CAN LIVE WITHOUT WILD THINGS AND SOME WHO CANNOT."
"FOR US IN THE MINORITY THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEE GEESE IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN TELEVISION.".....Aldo Leopold




"LOOK DEEP INTO NATURE, AND THEN YOU WILL UNDERSTAND EVERYTHING BETTER".....Albert Einstein


Tuesday, August 8, 2017

ELK in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks

Elk are commonly seen in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks.  They have been here for centuries. Their appearance can enhance almost any landscape...



In the fall the large antlers of the bulls command the attention of visitors; but in the spring and summer even the cows are crowd pleasers...



This bull is grazing near Uhl Hill, with the Tetons in the background...



Spring is the birthing season, with cows delivering calves in unexpected places.  This cow was in labor in our campground at Mammoth Hot Spring...



When the calves are young the mothers often leave then alone while they forage...



Once the calves are old enough to keep up they are often found at the mother's side...







Thanks for visiting, be well, and come back soon.

Sunday, July 30, 2017

Prepare For Unpredictable Weather in Yellowstone and Grand Teton

One can never count on predictable weather in northwest Wyoming.  The first photo was taken on May 27, 2017...



Later, on the same day, heavy clouds were rolling through...



A ride up the Lamar Valley on June 12, revealed frosty branches...



The low clouds and ice on the mountains made for an ominous appearance...









On June 24, there was still plenty of snow piled up in the highlands.  The next photos were taken on Dunraven Pass...







My advice is to bring a few clothes suitable for any weather conditions.  It might be summer where you live but completely different in the parks.

Thanks for visiting, be well, and come back soon.

Monday, July 17, 2017

COYOTES in Yellowstone and Grand Tetton National Parks

Many people do not like coyotes for various reasons, including predation on domestic animals including lambs, calves, domestic fowl, dogs and cats.  I can understand their points of view.

The majority of coyotes feed on rodents, rabbits, birds, scavenged carcasses, and even young deer and pronghorn antelope when they can catch them.  All of these are natural food for the coyote.

Personally, I enjoy seeing them and appreciate their role in the natural world...



In our national parks they are often seen near roads where it is easy to pick up a meal of a car-killed critter of some type...







Before they shed their winter coats they can be handsome...





Thanks for visiting, be well, and come back soon.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

MULE DEER DOE with FAWN

I want to thank the blog readers, and others, who sent well wishes since my hemorrhagic stroke last month.  I am feeling better, and getting better, every day.

This mule deer doe, and her fawn, were near the Roosevelt Junction in Yellowstone…





From the size of the fawn I would guess that it is only a few days old…










The doe will have her hands full keeping the fawn safe from coyotes and traffic...







Thanks for visiting, be well, and stop back soon.

Friday, June 16, 2017

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK (Part Nine) Black Bears

Black bears seem to be more common in Yellowstone this year than in Grand Teton National Park.  Each year we tend to see them in the same areas indicating they have established territories much the same as grizzly bears do.

Some bears that we see have been sixteen month old cubs, forced out by their mothers.  The sows will be in heat soon and it would not be safe for the young bears to be in the vicinity when boars come around seeking to mate…


Many bears are seen grazing on grass near the roads…






This sow, with two cubs, caused a traffic jam at the Yellowstone bridge when traffic had to be halted for them to cross the river via the bridge…









Some black sows, like this one, have cinnamon colored cubs, and on occasion, one cinnamon and one black…




This cinnamon sow had a single cinnamon cub.  I was able to photograph them near the petrified tree; a well known landmark in Yellowstone…









Thanks for visiting, be well, and come back soon.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK (Part Eight) Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep

This has been our first trip to Yellowstone when no mature bighorn rams were visible.  Thanks to a small band of young sheep at the Yellowstone picnic area we were able to view some each time we went by.

This small ram seemed to have a hard time staying awake...





A ewe was bedded down nearby...



These three ewes were arguing over the pecking order in the harem....



I am pretty sure the darker one behind the tree won...



While passing the Calcite Spring area we spotted this ewe with her lamb...



Thanks for visiting, be well, and come back soon.

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