"A Sand County Almanac"

"THERE ARE SOME WHO CAN LIVE WITHOUT WILD THINGS AND SOME WHO CANNOT."
"FOR US IN THE MINORITY THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEE GEESE IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN TELEVISION.".....Aldo Leopold




"LOOK DEEP INTO NATURE, AND THEN YOU WILL UNDERSTAND EVERYTHING BETTER".....Albert Einstein


Monday, September 3, 2012

Black Bears


This spring and summer I have spent many hours, and driven a lot of miles, chasing down reports of black bear sightings.  I have always been too late to take photos, or even see a bear, for that matter.  I thought I would relieve my frustration by posting some photos from past trips to Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks in Wyoming.

Black bears are not always black.  They can be black, brown, cinnamon, blonde or white. Black is the dominant color and most often seen, but Yellowstone also has a good population of cinnamon phase black bears…
 
All bears, grizzly and black, are omnivores meaning that they will eat vegetation and berries as well as fresh meat, insects and carrion.  They are often spotted along roads in the park looking for road killed carcasses or grazing on plants…
 
 
 
 
 

Bears are constantly hungry. They need to pack on enough fat in five months to see them through hibernation, which can last seven months.  It’s a daunting task which keeps them on the move searching for food.  In the following photos a sow has pulled a road killed deer to the base of a tree for her cub and herself…
 

 

Some bears become so well known to tourists and park employees that they are named and their every movement tracked on web sites devoted to the park and its animals.  “Rosie” is one such bear.  She has proven to be very tolerant of humans observing her and her cubs which provides great photo opportunities for tourists…




On hot summer days who can blame a bear for wanting to take a quick dip in a cool mountain stream?






Early one morning I encountered this cinnamon phase black bear as he was scratching an itch.  A young pine tree proved to be just the thing to get the job done…





 Bears are frequently seen rubbing their backs on trees as if to scratch a hard to reach spot.  Biologists now know that they are scent marking their territory. Exactly what they are communicating to other bears remains a mystery, although theories abound…

 
When they don't want to be bothered black bears often take refuge in trees...
 

 
This post is getting a little long so I will end for now. 
Remember, you are always welcome to stop back anytime.

 

 

2 comments:

  1. Beautiful pics of this bears you presents here.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, Lorents. Bears are one of my favorite animals to observe and photograph.
    Steve

    ReplyDelete

I sincerely enjoy comments from my visitors. I must ask that those wishing to comment understand that moderation has become necessary due to the nature of some comments left in the past...

Visitor Counter